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railroad worker injuries Archives

Railroad worker injuries often permanently disabling

Many Connecticut children grow up singing songs about working on the railroad. While such ditties are often entertaining and amusing, the reality of railroad work is often quite dangerous. In fact, railroad worker injuries often occur that result in permanent disabilities.

Railroad worker injuries have been occurring since the 1800s

When the first tracks were laid for the transcontinental railroad in the 1800s, many people took advantage of new job opportunities by securing work at various locations along the planned route. Many of the workers were immigrants, perhaps including some from Connecticut. It didn't take long for railroad worker injuries to occur, especially when mountains were blasted with dynamite to create enormous tunnels through which locomotives would eventually pass.

Navigating the aftermath of railroad worker injuries

Getting injured on the job in Connecticut is more likely in some industries than others. Working on the railroad ranks high on lists naming most dangerous jobs in the nation. Knowing where to turn for support when railroad worker injuries occur is a key factor in achieving the fullest recoveries possible.

Railroad worker injuries often lead to litigation

There's a difference between working on a railroad and other jobs, such as construction, agriculture or industrial, when it comes to obtaining recovery after workplace accidents. Most Connecticut residents are familiar with the workers' compensation program that provides benefits to employees injured on the job to help pay medical expenses and replace lost wages. Such benefits do not exist for those who work on the railroad because injured railroad workers can actually sue their employers for negligence in a civil court.

Where to seek support following railroad worker injuries

Traveling by train in Connecticut and throughout the nation remains a popular form of vehicular navigation. A successful train operation includes the people behind the scenes who work long hours and put forth much effort to maintain locomotive safety and efficiency. When railroad worker injuries occur due to accidents on the tracks or in some other aspect of the industry, it's important for injured employees to know where to turn for help.

Train worker injury: Don't get railroaded into settling for less

Many children who love to lie on floors while playing with toy trains grow up to become conductors, engineers, track repair workers or other employees in the railroad industry. In fact, many say a childhood love of trains usually remains intact for a lifetime. Of course, much changes between youth and adulthood, and where playing with trains versus working on the railroad is concerned, the latter is far more dangerous than the former.

Railroad worker injuries focus of a recent lawsuit

Most employees in Connecticut are able to file claims for workers' compensation benefits if they're involved in workplace accidents that result in their own injuries. Railroad worker injuries, however, are not covered under workers' comp for all railroad accident situations involving employees, which are handled under the Federal Employers Liability Act. A railroad worker in another state has brought a situation to the court's attention, accusing his employers of negligence on the job.

Don't confuse FELA with workers' compensation

If you were to take a quick survey on the street in Connecticut, asking passers-by what they think the most dangerous jobs in the nation are, many would mention work in construction and farming. Some, however, may also include railroad work high on their lists, for statistics prove train workers are always at high risk for injuries. If your family history in the United States stretches back several decades or more, you likely have a relative who used to work (or currently works) on the railroad.

Railroad worker injuries central topic of ongoing lawsuit

A brief study of U.S. history shows the significance of the development and installation of a transcontinental railroad. Life in Connecticut and throughout the nation changed in many ways, once trains became available for transporting goods (and people). Along with ease of travel and new mercantile opportunities, a more negative consequence of train transportation in America was railroad worker injuries.

Railroad worker injuries result from unregulated shuttle services

Working in the railroad industry in Connecticut and across the United States is among the most dangerous jobs a person can have. In fact, to emphasize the importance of workplace safety, the railroad industry does not participate in workers' compensation insurance coverage. Instead, a worker must prove the injuries are the result negligence on the part of the railroad. Instead of insurance companies paying for railroad worker injuries, the railroads themselves are held responsible. This motivates railroads to strive for safety.