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July 2017 Archives

Resources for those recovering from railroad worker injuries

Along with construction, community service rescue work and agriculture employment, railroad work in Connecticut is high on the list of most dangerous jobs in the nation. Railroad worker injuries often prevent those afflicted from returning to their duties, sometimes indefinitely. This can place undue hardships on their families, who may have trouble making ends meet on top of trying their best to attend to the medical and daily living needs of their injured loved ones.

Railroad worker injuries often permanently disabling

Many Connecticut children grow up singing songs about working on the railroad. While such ditties are often entertaining and amusing, the reality of railroad work is often quite dangerous. In fact, railroad worker injuries often occur that result in permanent disabilities.

Can oil and leaves on tracks cause railroad accidents?

Some people say so. In fact, a man who was working for a railroad in another state claims that was a key factor that caused a terrible two-locomotive collision in which he was involved. As in this instance, railroad accidents in Connecticut and beyond often lead to litigation, as employees are protected by the Federal Employers Liability Act in their ability to sue their employers when injuries occur due to negligence.

Railroad worker injuries have been occurring since the 1800s

When the first tracks were laid for the transcontinental railroad in the 1800s, many people took advantage of new job opportunities by securing work at various locations along the planned route. Many of the workers were immigrants, perhaps including some from Connecticut. It didn't take long for railroad worker injuries to occur, especially when mountains were blasted with dynamite to create enormous tunnels through which locomotives would eventually pass.

What illnesses are associated with asbestos exposure?

Over the last 100 years, railroad workers here in Connecticut and across the country have worked around asbestos. Brakes, pipes and boilers are just some of the equipment insulated with asbestos in the railroad industry. Railcars used to be full of the toxic substance to insulate against heat and electrical components.