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May 2017 Archives

Railroad worker injuries focus of a recent lawsuit

Most employees in Connecticut are able to file claims for workers' compensation benefits if they're involved in workplace accidents that result in their own injuries. Railroad worker injuries, however, are not covered under workers' comp for all railroad accident situations involving employees, which are handled under the Federal Employers Liability Act. A railroad worker in another state has brought a situation to the court's attention, accusing his employers of negligence on the job.

Aging equipment can lead to dangerous railroad accidents

Passenger trains have been a popular means of transportation for individuals in Connecticut and elsewhere for many years. Individuals who live in areas of heavily congested traffic often rely on trains to reach their destinations on time. The workers who operate these trains generally have demanding schedules intended to ensure customers aren't disappointed. Recent issues with similar modes of travel have raised concerns regarding safety and a possible need to take precautions to reduce the chance of railroad accidents.

Tracking paths to recovery after railroad accidents

Many Connecticut travelers choose commercial trains as their modes of transportation. Others not only ride the railroad on vacation but make their livings working there as well. There may be many perks to working on a railroad; still, this type of work continues to rank high on lists of the most dangerous jobs in the nation. When railroad accidents occur, the road to recovery may physically, emotionally and financially challenging.

Don't confuse FELA with workers' compensation

If you were to take a quick survey on the street in Connecticut, asking passers-by what they think the most dangerous jobs in the nation are, many would mention work in construction and farming. Some, however, may also include railroad work high on their lists, for statistics prove train workers are always at high risk for injuries. If your family history in the United States stretches back several decades or more, you likely have a relative who used to work (or currently works) on the railroad.

Railroad worker injuries central topic of ongoing lawsuit

A brief study of U.S. history shows the significance of the development and installation of a transcontinental railroad. Life in Connecticut and throughout the nation changed in many ways, once trains became available for transporting goods (and people). Along with ease of travel and new mercantile opportunities, a more negative consequence of train transportation in America was railroad worker injuries.